Tag: spyware

Impacts of Bill C-28 (the new anti-SPAM and anti-spyware legislation)Impacts of Bill C-28 (the new anti-SPAM and anti-spyware legislation)



The new anti-SPAM and anti-spyware legislation (Bill C-28) will have significant implications for entities carrying on business in Canada and for entities doing business with Canadians. Its scope is very broad. Its approach to tacking the challenges posed by SPAM, malware, spyware, false and misleading representations associated with electronic messages, and harvesting of electronic address and personal information, is comprehensive.

The legislation creates significant vicarious and accessorial liability for companies and for their officers and directors with the potential for administrative penalties of up to $10 million and damages awards which can reach $1 million per day or per breach.

Canada Passes Anti-Spam and Anti-Spyware LawCanada Passes Anti-Spam and Anti-Spyware Law



Organizations that conduct business online should start preparing for Canada’s new anti-spam and anti-spyware legislation, which was passed in mid-December and is expected to come into force later this year.1 As the Act is complex and the penalties for violating the new law can be severe, organizations should review and modify their online practices, where necessary, at an early opportunity.

Anti-Spam Provisions

The Act prohibits organizations from sending commercial electronic messages unless the recipient has given express or implied consent.

Developments in Computer, Internet and E-Commerce Law (2009-2010)Developments in Computer, Internet and E-Commerce Law (2009-2010)



Here are the slides used in my presentation to the Toronto Computer Lawyers Group earlier today,  The Year in Review: Developments in Computer, Internet and E-Commerce Law (2009-2010). It covers significant developements since my talk last spring.

The slides include a summary of the following cases and statutory references:

Tercon Contractors Ltd. v. British Columbia, 2010 SCC 4

Internet Broadcasting Corporation Ltd. v Mar LLC [2009] EWHC 844 (Ch)

Gammasonics Institute for Medical Research Pty Ltd v Comrad Medical Sysytems Pty Ltd [2010] NSWSC 267 (9 April 2010)

Kingsway Hall Hotel Ltd.

Government introduces bills to fight SPAM and spyware and to amend PIPEDAGovernment introduces bills to fight SPAM and spyware and to amend PIPEDA



Earlier today the Government introduced two important Bills – Bills C-28 and C-29.

Bill C-28, Fighting Internet and Wireless Spam Act, is the re-introduction of the Electronic Commerce Protection Act (ECPA). It is essentially the Bill as passed by the House of Commons just before the olympics with a few changes. Most of the changes are to harmonize the language to drafting conventions or to clarify the legislative intent.

The Bill is a major improvement over the initial version of the ECPA which was significantly improved during the Industry Committee review.

Industry Committee Amends Anti-Spam Bill (ECPA)Industry Committee Amends Anti-Spam Bill (ECPA)



By Barry Sookman and James Gannon

In May of this year, we sent an e-Alert that reviewed the concerns many Canadian businesses had expressed with the first draft of Bill C-27 – the Electronic Commerce Protection Act (ECPA). The Bill was criticized for containing overly broad anti-spam and anti-spyware provisions that would have rendered illegal many common legitimate commercial practices. It would have potentially exposed businesses to millions of dollars in fines and liabilities for activities that were unrelated to sending spam emails or installing spyware programs.

Anti-Spam Bill Raises ConcernsAnti-Spam Bill Raises Concerns



On May 8, 2009, the Electronic Commerce Protection Act (ECPA) received a second reading in the House of Commons. The Government of Canada had introduced the bill on April 24th. The intention of the ECPA is “to deter the most dangerous forms of spam, such as identity theft, phishing and spyware, from occurring in Canada” and to “help drive spammers out of Canada.” The bill also contains provisions intended to combat spyware by prohibiting the installation of computer programs without the consent of the computer’s owner.