Hard lessons in dataset licensing to create commercial products: 77m v Ordnance SurveyHard lessons in dataset licensing to create commercial products: 77m v Ordnance Survey



If you are interested in database licensing, the intrigue of how complex geo-spatial based services are developed, electronic mapping and polygons, the legality of scraping, how online terms governing databases are construed, and database rights, then the recent UK decision in 77m Ltd v Ordnance Survey Ltd [2019] EWHC 3007 (Ch) (08 November 2019) is for you.

The dispute in the case was between a start-up company 77m and Ordnance Survey (OS), the national mapping agency of Great Britain. 77m created a dataset called Matrix consisting of an up-to-date, detailed and accurate list of the geospatial coordinates of all the residential and non-residential addresses in Great Britain containing 28 million records.

When copyright in a work transfers to the Crown: Keatley v TeranetWhen copyright in a work transfers to the Crown: Keatley v Teranet



When does copyright transfer to the Crown under the Copyright Act? The Supreme Court clarified this in a landmark ruling released earlier today in Keatley Surveying Ltd. v. Teranet Inc., 2019 SCC 43, authoritatively interpreting Section 12 of the Act.

The Court did so in delivering two sets of reasons, the majority written by Justice Abella  (Moldaver, Karakatsanis and Martin JJ. concurring) and by Justices Côté and Brown JJ. (Wagner C.J. concurring). All seven Judges agreed that the decision of the Court of Appeal (2017 ONCA 748) which sided with Teranet should be affirmed.

OPC drops transborder transfer of data consultationOPC drops transborder transfer of data consultation



Earlier this year the Privacy Commissioner launched and then relaunched a consultation that caused shockwaves among privacy lawyers, the tech community, and just about every organization that has third parties process data for them. The OPC sought to change its longstanding interpretation of Canada’s privacy law, PIPEDA, to require the consent of individuals to transfer personal information to a third party for processing.

The OPC received numerous submissions opposing the change including from the CLHIA, Centre for Information Policy Leadership, PMAC, and Canadian Chamber of Commerce.

OPC consultation on trans-border data flows: my submission to the consultationOPC consultation on trans-border data flows: my submission to the consultation



Dear M. Therrien:

Thank you for the opportunity to provide input into the consultation on whether consent is or should be required for transborder data flows for processing.

Introduction

By way of introduction, I am a senior technology lawyer with McCarthy Tétrault. I have significant experience in outsourcings of all types, both domestic and trans-national. I have been involved in some of Canada largest and most complex outsourcing transactions. In this connection, and as part of my privacy practice, I regularly advise clients on privacy issues associated with transfers and disclosures of personal information.

Developments in computer, Internet and e-commerce law: the year in review (2018-2019)Developments in computer, Internet and e-commerce law: the year in review (2018-2019)



I gave my annual presentation yesterday to the Toronto computer Lawyers’ Group on “The year in review in Computer, Internet and E-Commerce Law”. It covers the period from June 2018 to June 2019. The developments include cases from Canada, the U.S. the U.K., EU, Australia, South Africa, India and other countries.

The developments are organized into the broad topics of:

  • Privacy / Big Data / AI
  • Employee / HR
  • E-commerce / Online Agreements
  • Online Remedies / Governance / Jurisdiction
  • Copyright

The cases and other documents referred to are below.

Shifting Paradigms: the Heritage Committee study on copyrightShifting Paradigms: the Heritage Committee study on copyright



Earlier this week the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage released its report Shifting Paradigms. The Committee studied remuneration models for artists and the creative industries including the challenges and opportunities for creators. The Committee found several major themes that connected testimony throughout the study:

  • the increasing value gap (a disparity between the value of creative content enjoyed by consumers and the revenues that are received by artists and the creative industries)
  • the decline in the artistic middle class
  • the negative impact of technology on creative industries, and
  • changes in consumer culture and the Indigenous perspective on copyright

The Committee’s conclusions were no surprise to people working in the creative industries.

The Unintended Equustek Effect: a reply to Michael GeistThe Unintended Equustek Effect: a reply to Michael Geist



Cyberspace is not a “No Law Land”. That was the title to a study conduced for Industry Canada in 1997. It started with this quote from Bill Gates, Microsoft’s co-founder:

It’s always surprising how old concepts carry into the new medium. It’s overly idealistic to act like, Oh, the Internet is the one place where people should be able to do whatever they wish: present child pornography, do scams, libel people, steal copyrighted material. Society’s values have not changed fundamentally just because it’s an Internet page.

Democracy under threat: Parliament must actDemocracy under threat: Parliament must act



There was a time when large platforms could do no wrong. They were engines that facilitated free speech, political debate, and were seen as a revolutionary force for democratization. They were largely unregulated. In fact, they were accorded special trust and treatment, especially in the United States, where they were given unprecedented and controversial immunities from suits under the Communications Decency Act for enabling the dissemination of illegal content such as hate speech, defamation, and harassing information.

Then came the public revelations about false and misleading information campaigns, disinformation and manipulation of news, disseminated via the Internet and social media (referred to here collectively as “fake news”) of gargantuan proportions – Cambridge Analytica, Brexit, and the presidential election of Donald Trump, among others.

Norms for copyright reform: my submission to the INDU CommitteeNorms for copyright reform: my submission to the INDU Committee



Here is my submission to the INDU Committee conducting the s.92 review of the Copyright Act. It is based on my remarks made to the Committee when I appeared before it on December 3, 2018. My remarks to the Committee and answers to questions can be accessed on Parvu.

_________________________

I am a Senior Partner in the technology law group of McCarthy Tétrault.  I have represented members of the creative industries, intermediaries and users. I also teach intellectual property law at Osgoode Hall Law School and have published books including on copyright and Internet law.