Category: de-listing orders

Google’s loss in online defamation case Trkulja v Google good reason to resist CDA in NAFTAGoogle’s loss in online defamation case Trkulja v Google good reason to resist CDA in NAFTA



There is a repeating pattern in online defamation cases against Google. An individual’s reputation is alleged to be tarnished by Google’s search results or its autocomplete feature. The individuals plead with Google for help. As one of the Internet’s most important gatekeepers, Google is in a position to stop the damage, especially because its algorithms are the source of it. Google refuses to help, or does so only partially. Courts rule against Google finding it a publisher, at least once it has notice.

Google attempted end run around Canadian courts fails, rules BC Judge in Equustek caseGoogle attempted end run around Canadian courts fails, rules BC Judge in Equustek case



Yesterday, a judge of the British Columbia Supreme Court dismissed Google’s motion to vary or set aside the global injunction against it that had been affirmed by the Supreme Court of Canada. The injunction required Google delist websites that were being used to market a product that Equustek claimed was developed through theft of its trade secrets. Justice Smith in Equustek Solutions Inc. v. Jack, 2018 BCSC 610 held that Google was not able to show that the global delisting order made by against it violated its First Amendment rights in the U.S.