Posts Tagged ‘WIPO’

Dr. Ficsor is right; Prof. Geist is wrong about the WIPO Internet Treaties

December 23rd, 2009

Earlier this week, Dr. Ficsor posted a blog inviting Canada to join the international community by ratifying the WIPO Internet Treaties. Dr. Ficsor is an internationally revered copyright scholar and professor and the former Assistant Director General of WIPO. As his posting pointed out, he was also responsible for organizing the preparatory work of the two Treaties, for the 1996 Diplomatic Conference adopting them, and for the first efforts to achieve their adequate implementation, There is no one on the planet who knows more about the treaties or what was intended by them than him.

Dr. Ficsor: An invitation to Canada to join the international community by ratifying the WIPO Internet Treaties

December 21st, 2009

Geneva, December 21, 2009: An invitation – presented to Canada to join the international community by ratifying and duly implementing the WIPO “Internet Treaties” – that should not be turn down

Why Canada Should Not Adopt Fair Use: A joint submission to the Copyright Consultation

September 15th, 2009

Why Canada Should Not Adopt Fair Use:  A joint submission to the Copyright Consultation by Barry Sookman and Dan Glover on behalf of over 45 organisations.

Why Canada should not adopt fair use

Copyright Reform for Canada: What Should We Do? My submission to the Copyright consultation

September 13th, 2009

This is a copy of my personal submission to the Canadian Government consultation on copyright reform.

Sookman Copyright Consultation Reform Submission

For more information about the Copyright Modernization Act or Bill C-11 or copyright reform, see Change and the Copyright Modernization Act.

A Time for Change: Toward a New Era for Intellectual Property Rights in Canada.

April 30th, 2009

The Canadian Intellectual Property Council (CIPC) recently released a report entitled A Time for Change: Toward a New Era for Intellectual Property Rights in Canada. The report discusses the importance of an effective intellectual property (IP) rights (IPR) system in encouraging innovation, ensuring economic prosperity, and maintaining global competitiveness. It then outlines a number of areas in which Canada’s IPR regime lags behind other nations and does not adequately protect IPRs. In particular, it notes that counterfeiting and piracy go largely unchecked in Canada, costing the Canadian economy an estimated $22 billion annually.