Posts Tagged ‘Schrems’

Schrems, what the CJEU decided and why it is a problem for Canadian and other non-EU businesses (updated)

October 12th, 2015

On October 6, 2015 the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) released a bombshell, but not completely unexpected judgment, invalidating a decision of the European Commission that underpinned the EU-US privacy safe harbor. In Schrems v. Data Protection Commissioner [2015] EUECJ C-362/14 (06 October 2015), the CJEU held that supervisory data authorities in Member States have the joint right with the EU Commission to review whether non-EU countries provide adequate protection to personal data transferred to them from the EU despite a decision by the EU Commission that such protection is provided. It also invalided Commission Decision 2000/520 which had found that transfers of personal data to the US from the EU provided adequate protection where the recipient complied with the EU-US Safe Harbour Principles.

Schrems brings down EU-US safe harbour

October 6th, 2015

EU’s highest court struck a major blow to the EU-US safe harbour earlier today in the closely watched case, Schrems v. Data Protection Commissioner [2015] EUECJ C-362/14 (06 October 2015). The decision of the CJEU, which followed the earlier opinion of the Advocate General, is the worst privacy nightmare that could have been imagined by the thousands of US and EU based companies that rely on the safe harbour to transfer personal data to the US for processing. It affects giant social networks like Facebook, search engines like Google, cloud hosting providers, and thousands of other companies that do business in the EU and that transfer personal data to the US.