Posts Tagged ‘FIWSA’

Rethinking CASL

May 25th, 2011

SPAM is awful.  It wastes our time. It clogs the Internet. It is full of scams, malware and fraudulent, false and misleading messages. Who wouldn’t cheer when Canada finally decided late in 2010 to outlaw SPAM and related afflictions of malware, spyware, address harvesting and sending false and misleading commercial electronic messages?

Indeed, there was much satisfaction when Canada’s anti-SPAM law, also known as FISA[2], was given royal assent on December 15, 2011.  After a lengthy and thorough review process, including consultations and Parliamentary reviews, Canadians could look forward to the toughest anti-SPAM law in the world just as soon as the regulations were finalized, which is expected this summer.

Name Canada’s Anti-Spam/Anti-Spyware Law

February 6th, 2011

Canada has a new anti-SPAM and anti-spyware law, Bill –C-28. It is a law with an inordinately long name: “An Act to promote the efficiency and adaptability of the Canadian economy by regulating certain activities that discourage reliance on electronic means of carrying out commercial activities, and to amend the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission Act, the Competition Act, the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act and the Telecommunications Act”.

The Bill has no short title. As a result different terms and acronyms are being used to refer to it including the ECPA, FISA, FIWSA, the SPAM Bill, the Anti-SPAM Legislation, and the Anti-SPAM and Anti-Spyware Bill.

Impacts of Bill C-28 (the new anti-SPAM and anti-spyware legislation)

January 26th, 2011

The new anti-SPAM and anti-spyware legislation (Bill C-28) will have significant implications for entities carrying on business in Canada and for entities doing business with Canadians. Its scope is very broad. Its approach to tacking the challenges posed by SPAM, malware, spyware, false and misleading representations associated with electronic messages, and harvesting of electronic address and personal information, is comprehensive.

The legislation creates significant vicarious and accessorial liability for companies and for their officers and directors with the potential for administrative penalties of up to $10 million and damages awards which can reach $1 million per day or per breach.