Posts Tagged ‘ccer’

Change and the Copyright Modernization Act

November 7th, 2012

Bill C-11, the Copyright Modernization Act, with a few exceptions, is now law with the publication of the Governor General Order in Council. The fourth attempt to amend the Copyright Act since 2005 succeeded where Bills C-60 (2005), C-61 (2008), and C-32 (2010) did not.

A lot has changed since 2005 when Bill C-60 was first introduced. That Bill would have made a limited, but important, set of amendments. Its summary reminds us that it would have amended the “Copyright Act to implement the provisions of the WIPO Copyright Treaty and the WIPO Performances and Phonograms Treaty, to clarify the liability of network service providers, to facilitate technology-enhanced learning and interlibrary loans, and to update certain other provisions of the Act.”  Bill C-11 addresses far more than this.

The Owens analysis of the Canadian copyright consultations: what are the implications?

April 21st, 2010

Earlier this week, Richard Owens, the past chair of the board of directors of the University of Toronto Innovations Foundation, a member of the board and former Executive Director of the Centre for Innovation and Policy at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, and an adjunct professor of copyright and technology law at the University of Toronto, published a critical analysis of last summer’s copyright consultation. In his paper, Noises Heard: Canada’s Recent Online Copyright Consultation Process: Teachings and Cautions, he concluded that the consultation “was systematically abused by a clandestine group of mod-chip distributors, foreign websites administrators and international BitTorrent users”.  His focus was on the form letter wizard made available by the Canadian Coalition for Electronic Rights (CCER), a group whose very businesses depends on the ability to make illegal copies of software and to circumvent technological measures.

100,000 Voters Who Don’t Exist

November 10th, 2009

Interesting blog by Chris Castle  that raises important questions about the Canadian Coalition for Electronic Rights’ (CCER) letter writing wizard and manipulation of the Copyright Consultations.

Castle describes CCER as “a mod chip makers trade association” “that allowed users to send a pre-fabricated letter to a predetermined but undisclosed list of ministers and Members of Parliament that supported a wide variety of anti-copyright—and especially anticircumvention—issues.”

He says: “The CCER letter writing wizard seems to be of very, very questionable provenance.” Castle states that “A little quick sampling of the posted letters suggests that a substantial number of them (perhaps over half) came from CCER.” (The number is much higher than that; by my estimate approx. 65%).