Posts Tagged ‘anti-spam law’

Evaluating the Industry Canada CASL regulations: my submission to the consultation

February 5th, 2013

Yesterday, along with many organizations, I filed a personal submission to the Industry Canada consultation on the draft Electronic Commerce Protection Regulations. My cover letter addressed to Bruce Wallace of Industry Canada is set out below and is followed by a copy of the complete submission.

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I appreciate the opportunity to provide comments on the above-noted consultations.

I make these comments in my personal capacity and not on behalf of my firm or any of its clients. I write as one of the leading technology lawyers in Canada and the author of a six volume book on Computer, Internet and e-Commerce Law, the most authoritative book on these subjects in Canada. I am also an adjunct Professor of intellectual property law at Osgoode Hall Law School.

Evaluating the Industry Canada CASL regulations: defining commercial electronic message

January 30th, 2013

In a previous post, Evaluating the Industry Canada CASL regulations: why they are needed, I suggested that close scrutiny needs to be given to Industry Canada’s new draft Electronic Commerce Protection Regulations. CASL’s “ban all” structure makes it imperative that generous regulations be adopted to ensure that the goal’s of Canada’s new anti-spam/anti-malware law (CASL) are met. In another post, Evaluating the Industry Canada CASL regulations: how to assess them, I proposed a framework for assessing the regulations.

Evaluating the IC CASL regulations: the B2B exception and Non-business entities

January 22nd, 2013

In a previous post,Evaluating the Industry Canada CASL regulations: why they are needed, I suggested that close scrutiny needs to be given to Industry Canada’s new draft Electronic Commerce Protection Regulations. CASL’s “ban all” structure makes it imperative that generous regulations be adopted to ensure that the goal’s of Canada’s new anti-spam/anti-malware law (CASL) are met. In another post, Evaluating the Industry Canada CASL regulations: how to assess them, I proposed a framework for assessing the regulations.

Evaluating the Industry Canada CASL regulations: the B2B exception (Part I-SMEs)

January 21st, 2013

In a previous post,Evaluating the Industry Canada CASL regulations: why they are needed, I suggested that close scrutiny needs to be given to Industry Canada’s new draft Electronic Commerce Protection Regulations. CASL’s “ban all” structure makes it imperative that generous regulations be adopted to ensure that the goal’s of Canada’s new anti-spam/anti-malware law (CASL) are met. In another post, Evaluating the Industry Canada CASL regulations: how to assess them, I proposed a framework for assessing the regulations. I then evaluated the proposed family and personal relationships exception in the post, Evaluating the Industry Canada CASL regulations: family relationships and personal relationships, finding them very troubling and materially failing to meet CASL’s objectives.

Evaluating the Industry Canada CASL regulations: family relationships and personal relationships

January 18th, 2013

In a previous post, Evaluating the Industry Canada CASL regulations: why they are needed, I suggested that close scrutiny needs to be given to Industry Canada’s new draft Electronic Commerce Protection Regulations. CASL’s “ban all” structure makes it imperative that generous regulations be adopted to ensure that the goal’s of Canada’s new anti-spam/anti-malware law (CASL) are met. In another post, Evaluating the Industry Canada CASL regulations: how to assess them, I proposed a framework for assessing the regulations.

Evaluating the Industry Canada CASL regulations: how to assess them

January 16th, 2013

In a previous post,Evaluating the Industry Canada CASL regulations: why they are needed, I suggested thatclose scrutiny needs to be given toIndustry Canada’s new draft Electronic Commerce Protection Regulations. CASL’s “ban all” structure makes it imperative that regulations be adopted to ensure that the goal’s of Canada’s new anti-spam/anti-malware/spyware law (CASL) are met. Their adequacy and appropriateness should be measured against these and other generally recognized objectives. In this post I propose to lay out the framework for assessing the regulations.

Industry Canada CASL regulations coming

December 20th, 2012

Andre Leduc of Industry Canada gave a talk yesterday to the Council of Chief Privacy Officers at a Webinar organized by the Conference Board of Canada on the status of Canada’s anti-spam law, CASL. Andre Leduc is a Senior Policy Advisor (Spam, Cryptography and Cybercrime) with Industry Canada and was one of the architects of CASL. He has also been integrally involved in developing the Industry Canada regulations.

Andre Leduc said that CASL is likely to come into force in late 2013 at the earliest and June or July 2014, at the latest. It is most likely to be proclaimed into force early in 2014. Ultimately, this will be a decision of the Minister.

Will it be illegal to recommend a dentist under Canada’s new anti-spam law (CASL)?

January 3rd, 2012

Over the holidays I got an email from one of my relatives visiting Toronto. She asked me to recommend a dental surgeon for an unexpected tooth extraction. She also asked me to refer her to other dentists to get additional recommendations. I sent her an email with a recommendation to get treatment from a dental surgeon who I encouraged her to see and also provided the name of a family dentist who could make other recommendations. My email included a link to a website of the clinic operated by the dental surgeon. My wife sent a similar email when I told her my relative was looking for a dentist. Later that day I started wondering whether responding to this type of inquiry would be legal or illegal under Canada’s anti-spam law (CASL), once it is proclaimed into force.

Fixing CASL: comments on the draft CRTC and Industry Canada regulations

September 7th, 2011

Today is the last day for filing comments on the Electronic Commerce Protection Regulations proposed by Industry Canada and the CRTC. Submissions to the CRTC on the draft CRTC CASL regulations are available at the Commission’s website http://ow.ly/6o8Xq.

Here are our comments filed earlier today.

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