CASL in force in 2013

April 27th, 2012 by Barry Sookman No comments »

Industry Minister Paradis announced that Canada’s new anti-spam/anti-spyware bill known as CASL will become effectve sometime in 2013. In his prepared remarks to the Canada 3.0 Digital Media Forum, the Minister said: “And the anti-spam legislation, which we expect to take effect next year, will protect both Canadians and businesses against unwanted spam”.

Before CASL can become law, Industry Canada needs to finalize its regulations. New proposed regulations are expected to be published in the Canada Gazette within the next few months. There will then be a short period of time for comments before they become final.  The CRTC regulations have already been finalized.

Optus loses “TV Now” copyright appeal down under

April 26th, 2012 by Barry Sookman No comments »

Earlier today, the Full Court of Australia released its decision in the National Rugby League Investments Pty Limited v Singtel Optus Pty Ltd [2012] FCAFC 59 (27 April 2012) case. In a note made available along with the reasons of the court for reversing the decision of the primary judge, the court summarized its decision as follows:

Social media, intellectual property and the workplace, is there a gap in the law?

April 25th, 2012 by Barry Sookman 1 comment »

I gave a speech earlier today at the Law Society Special Lectures on Employment Law and the New Workplace in the Social Media Age. My talk was entitled,  “Is There a Gap in Intellectual Property Law?”  My slides are shown below.

iiNet not responsible for customers’ infringing acts says Australia High Court

April 20th, 2012 by Barry Sookman No comments »

The High Court of Australia released its decision in the Roadshow Films Pty Ltd v iiNet Ltd [2012] HCA 16 (20 April 2012) case earlier today. The panel of five judges, in two sets of reasons, dismissed the appeal from the Full Court. That court held that, on the facts of the case, iiNet, an Australian ISP, was not liable for authorising the infringing acts of its customers.

The key question in the appeal, was whether iiNet authorised its customers’ infringing acts. According to the Court, the key facts on which liability was premised were the following:

Holocaust remembrance and copyright

April 20th, 2012 by Barry Sookman No comments »

Earlier this week, in commemoration of Holocaust Remembrance Day,  the Law Society of Upper Canada and the League for Human Rights of B’nai Brith Canadahosted a public education forum to examine the ongoing search for justice for victims through Remembrance, Reconciliation and Restitution. I spoke on the subject of working through copyright issues in making historical/archive materials available. My slides are below.

View more presentations from bsookman

Value for signal case in Supreme Court today

April 17th, 2012 by Barry Sookman No comments »

This morning, the Supreme Court of Canada will begin hearing an appeal from the decision of the Federal Court of Appeal in the so called “value for signal” case. The Court of Appeal, in a split decision, ruled that the Broadcasting Act empowers the CRTC to establish a regime to enable private local television stations to choose to negotiate with broadcasting distribution undertakings a fair value in exchange for the distribution of the programming services broadcast by those local television stations.

Robert Levine and Brett Danaher at CMW

April 1st, 2012 by Barry Sookman No comments »

Last week, Robert Levine, author of Free Ride: How Digital Parasites are Destroying the Culture Business, and How the Culture Business Can Fight Back, and Brett Danaher, the author of a study on the effect of France’s HADOPI graduated response law, participated in several events in Toronto. This included talks by Robert Levine at the Economic Club, at Osoode Hall Law School, and at Canadian Music Week and by Brett Danaher at Osgoode Hall law School and Canadian Music Week. A summary of their talks at Osgoode Hall law School is available here.  Their talks at CMW can be seen below.

Reflections on the new CRTC CASL regulations

March 29th, 2012 by Barry Sookman No comments »

Earlier this month the CRTC published its final regulations under the new Canadian Anti-SPAM legislation (CASL). The regulations have now been published in the Canada Gazette. The Commission has now also provided an explanation of its reasons for why it made, or refused to make, changes to its previously issued draft regulations.

Industry Canada has followed a separate route. Rather than finalizing its regulations, it will publish a new set of regulations to obtain further feedback from the public. In view of the significant problems identified by approximately 60 associations, companies, and organizations as well as individuals that filed submissions with Industry Canada and the Commission this approach makes sense.

A Reply to William Patry

March 19th, 2012 by Dan Glover 3 comments »

The following is a reply to William Patry’s lengthy response to my blog of March 16. Both the blog and Mr. Patry’s response may be found here. Given the length of my reply, for ease of reading, I am posting my reply here and inserting a cross-reference to this page in the comments section of the March 16 blog.

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Mr. Patry,

I have the greatest respect for your knowledge and experience, and for your contributions to the copyright debate, both through your texts and through your lively blog. However, I sense a significant internal contradiction in your comment to my blogs that I would like to explore.

Misleading Parliament? Really?

March 16th, 2012 by Dan Glover 3 comments »

Early this week, I opened a lengthy response in Howard Knopf’s blog to my recent post in this blog. Never one to mince his words, Mr. Knopf suggests with sound and fury that I have sought to “mislead Parliament” by posting on the issue of the educational fair dealing provision. Although the House of Commons Committee on Copyright has completed its clause-by-clause review of Bill C-11 without touching this provision, there are certain statements in Mr. Knopf’s blog that need to be addressed.