Archive for the ‘internet jurisdiction’ category

US court thumbs its nose at Supreme Court of Canada: Google v Equustek

November 19th, 2017

A court in the Northern District of California in Google LLC v. Equustek Solutions Inc. 2017 WL 5000834 (Nov 2, 2017) issued an order earlier this month enjoining Equustek from enforcing the global de-indexing order it obtained against Google in a British Columbia court. This was an order that was given great scrutiny and which was affirmed by the Supreme Court of Canada in Google Inc. v. Equustek Solutions Inc., 2017 SCC 34 (summarized here).

Google v Equustek: worldwide de-indexing order against Google upheld by Supreme Court

June 28th, 2017

The Supreme Court of Canada released a landmark decision today ruling that Canadian common law courts have the jurisdiction to make global de-indexing orders against search engines like Google. In so, ordering, the Court in Google Inc. v. Equustek Solutions Inc., 2017 SCC 34 underlined the breadth of courts’ jurisdiction to make orders against search engines to stem illegal activities on the Internet including the sale of products manufactured using trade secrets misappropriated from innovative companies.

Jurisdiction simpliciter in copyright cases: Geophysical Service v Arcis Seismic Solutions

February 8th, 2015

In Club Resorts Ltd. v Van Breda, 2012 SCC 17, the Supreme Court clarified the rules for when a Canadian court can assume jurisdiction over a claim against a party located outside the jurisdiction. Specifically, it clarified the rules for applying the real and substantial test to determining if there is a sufficient connection between the subject matter of the action and the jurisdiction for  determining jurisdiction simpliciter. The Van Breda case did not, however, address how that test would apply to cases involving infringement of copyright.

Google ordered by BC court to block websites: Equustek Solutions Inc. v. Jack

July 23rd, 2014

In an important decision rendered on June 13, 2014, a Canadian court ordered Google to block a website that was selling goods that violated the trade secrets of the plaintiffs. The plaintiffs obtained a default judgment against the defendants. But, the defendants continued to sell the offending goods over the Internet. The plaintiffs, unable to enforce their judgment, asked for Google’s help in blocking the website. Google voluntarily de-indexed specific URL’s requested by the plaintiffs, but this “whac-a-mole” process was ineffective. When Google refused to de-index the offending websites from its search results, the plaintiffs brought a motion against Google for interim relief requiring Google to de-index the websites. Over Google’s objections, in Equustek Solutions Inc. v. Jack 2014 BCSC 1063, Madam Justice Fenlon of the British Columbia Supreme Court granted the injunction.

Internet pharmacies selling drugs to Americans illegal: Ontario College of Pharmacists v Global Pharmacy Canada

June 12th, 2013

The Ontario Court of Appeal confirmed in a decision released earlier this week that it is illegal to sell prescription drugs over the Internet to Americans where a substantial portion of the sales operations take place in Ontario when the seller is not licensed to operate a pharmacy in Ontario and otherwise does not comply with the laws and regulations governing pharmacies. In Ontario College of Pharmacists v. 1724665 Ontario Inc. (Global Pharmacy Canada), 2013 ONCA 381 the Court affirmed the decision of Justice Janet Wilson of the Superior Court of Justice who in Ontario College of Pharmacists v. 1724665 Ontario Inc., 2012 ONSC 5804 concluded that the appellants were selling prescription drugs, by retail, in Ontario; and were subject to the jurisdiction of the Ontario college of Pharmacists.