Archive for the ‘CASL’ category

John Kasich Trumped by CASL, Canada’s anti-spam law?

March 22nd, 2016

Last week I received several unsolicited emails including the one shown below asking for a donation to support Republican party leader hopeful John Kasich. The e-mail was sent without the remotest chance of there being an express or implied consent and without compliance with the prescribed information requirements of Canada’s much vilified anti-spam law, CASL.

kasich email

There is no doubt that Canadians have an important interest in who wins the US Presidential party nominations. Given the importance of the stakes, Canadian residents eligible to make a donation might have welcomed receiving the solicitation.

CASL: the looming disaster

December 10th, 2015

Another day, another article slamming CASL. Yesterday it was called “a bad law” in an FP Comment.  Today’s article titled CASL: A high-level look at the looming disaster called CASL “draconian” and stated “It’s hard to believe that antispam legislation can be this disastrous, but it’s true.” Well these authors can join an esteemed club. CASL has been ridiculed by the press which has called it, among other things, a Monty-Python-esque farce and Spamaflop, deeply stupid, and a sledgehammer that is ludicrous regulatory overkill. Its all that and more including almost certainly being unconstitutional.

CASL is a bad law

December 9th, 2015

CASL is a bad law and cannot reasonably be justified on any basis. On that issue, I recommend you read a feature article in the Financial Post today The great anti-spam cash grab. Here are a few choice extracts from the article.

CASL is a bad law. It offers no benefit to consumers, yet imposes red tape and additional costs on businesses. Worse still, it reduces competition, actually harming consumers. Finally, it is inconsistent with Canada’s free market economy and very likely unconstitutional…

CASL cannot work. It is incapable of stopping most spam…

Meanwhile, CASL imposes large costs on businesses…

CASL gets Rogers Media

November 21st, 2015

The CRTC announced yesterday that it bagged another CASL pelt – this time Rogers Media. The company agreed to an undertaking with the CRTC and to pay $200,000 to avoid expensive enforcement proceedings.

Rogers Media allegedly sent commercial emails (CEMs) containing an unsubscribe mechanism that did not function properly or which could not be readily performed by the recipient. In some instances, the electronic address used to unsubscribe was allegedly not valid for the required minimum of 60 days following the sent message. Rogers Media also allegedly failed to honour, within 10 business days, requests from some recipients to unsubscribe from receiving future commercial emails.

CASL: the unofficial FAQ, regulatory impact statement, and compliance guideline

January 14th, 2015

The “anti-spam” portion of Canada’s anti-spam/spyware law (CASL) came into on July 1, 2014. The “malware/spyware” computer program provisions come into force on January 15, 2015.

Most organizations are having very difficult times adapting to CASL’s confusing and prescriptive rules. According to a recent mini-survey conducted by the Canadian Chamber of Commerce of over 160 of its members, from responses to questions answered over 90% of Canadian organizations believe that CASL should be scrapped, amended, or at least be subject to a Parliamentary review before it becomes law. Over 80% believe it will not be effective against the most harmful sources of spam. 63% believe that it will make business more difficult for them.  Most believe CASL’s consent, disclosure and unsubscribe requirements are disproportionate and unreasonable. 56% believe CASL will impede the creation of a business environment driven by entrepreneurs that encourages jobs, growth and long term prosperity for Canadians.

CASL: getting consents for upgrades to computer programs on pre-installed and resold devices

November 24th, 2014

Canada’s anti-spam law (CASL) requires a person installing updates or upgrades to computer programs on another person’s computer system to obtain an express consent. This can be a challenge. If a person is able to get a consent to the installation of the program before installing it, the person can get consent to the installation of the update or upgrade at that time. The person cannot get consent for updates or upgrades that require enhanced disclosure under s.10(5) of CASL at that time, unless, of course, the person knows about them and can get a consent for them in advance.

CASL: when is a computer program installed or caused to be installed according to the CRTC

November 18th, 2014

The computer program provisions in Canada’s anti-spam law (CASL) are very hard to apply in practice. One of the most difficult interpretive challenges involves determining what the phrase “install or cause to be installed” means. CASL only applies where a person installs or causes to be installed a program on someone else’s computer. The CRTC released a Guideline that attempts to clarify what CASL means by that phrase. In information sessions last week to IT.Can and ITAC members, Dana-Lynn Wood and Lynne Perrault of the CRTC attempted to provide even further guidance on this issue. However, after fielding a series of questions on the issue, they agreed the issue was still unclear and that it was necessary for them to give further consideration to the issue.

CASL Spamaflop not constitutional

November 17th, 2014

I have argued many times on this blog that Canada’s anti-spam law (CASL) would not survive a Charter challenge. It’s “ban all” approach to regulating commercial speech, with limited exceptions, cannot be justified.  Professor Emir Crowne,  Associate Professor, University of Windsor, Faculty of Law, just published a paper together with Stephanie Provato agreeing with this opinion, Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation: A Constitutional Analysis, 31 J. Marshall J. Info. Tech. & Privacy L. 1.

The abstract of the article says the following:

CASL computer program guidance from the CRTC

November 12th, 2014

This week has been eventful on the CASL front with the CRTC providing guidance on how it is likely to interpret CASL’s computer program provisions. Monday evening the CRTC published a new guideline on the interpretation of CASL. This was followed by a presentation given to IT.Can members by Andy Kaplan Myrth of Industry Canada and Dana-Lynn Wood and Lynne Perrault of the CRTC. The presentation was a follow-up to an earlier IT.Can meeting where the CRTC asked for and received a list of questions for which guidance is being sought by the public. This information session was part of a cross country tour by the CRTC to provide information to the public about CASL.

CASL’s inscrutable computer program provisions to be tackled by CRTC 

September 18th, 2014

With the computer program sections of Canada’s anti-spam/anti-malware law (CASL) coming into force in January 2015, the CRTC has now started reaching out to the public for questions they want guidance on in FAQs or bulletins. I attended such a session last week (on September 9, 2014) at an IT.CAN Public Affairs Forum Roundtable. The attendees were Dana-Lynn Wood (Senior Enforcement Officer, Electronic Commerce Enforcement, CRTC) Kelly-Anne Smith (Legal Counsel, Legal Sector CRTC), and Andre Leduc (Manager of the National Anti-spam Coordinating Body, Industry Canada).