Archive for December, 2011

Canadian Patent Office allows Amazon.com’s “one-click” patent

December 31st, 2011

Last month the Federal Court of Appeal issued its reasons in the Amazon.com “one-click” patent case. Since the Court of Appeal directed the Commissioner to revisit Amazon.com’s application, it was not clear whether or not the patent was eligible subject matter.[1] The decision of the Court of Appeal left many questions unanswered.

It appears that the Patent Office has now determined that Amazon.com’s patent application,  “Method and System For Placing A Purchase Order Via A Communication Network” (Canadian Patent Application No. 2,246,933), is eligible subject matter. Patent Office records show that following an amendment made on December 22, 2011 a Notice of Allowance was issued on December 23, 2011. The records also show that the Final Fee was paid on December 28, 2011.

Computer and Internet Law Updates for 2011-12-31

December 31st, 2011

Computer and Internet Law Updates for 2011-12-30

December 30th, 2011

Computer and Internet Law Updates for 2011-12-29

December 29th, 2011

Computer and Internet Law Updates for 2011-12-28

December 28th, 2011

Computer and Internet Law Updates for 2011-12-27

December 27th, 2011

Computer and Internet Law Updates for 2011-12-26

December 26th, 2011

Computer and Internet Law Weekly Updates for 2011-12-25

December 25th, 2011

Computer and Internet Law Updates for 2011-12-24

December 24th, 2011

Canada is market for TPM trafficking and bittorrent indexing sites says USTR report

December 23rd, 2011

The Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) issued a Special 301 Out-of-Cycle Review of Notorious Markets. In the review, the USTR identified markets that typify the problem of marketplaces that deal in goods and services that infringe on intellectual property rights and help to sustain global piracy and counterfeiting. Canada was listed in several of these markets.

According to the USTR “The scale and popularity of these markets can cause economic harm to U.S. and other IP right holders.  In addition, products sold at these markets may pose possible health and safety risks to consumers.”